This Day in the Church

This Day in the Church.

St. Catherine of Siena

Catherine Benincasa, born in Siena at a date that remains uncertain, was favored with visions from the age of seven. Becoming a tertiary of the Dominican Order, she acquired great influence by her life of prayer and extraordinary mortifications as well as by the spread of her spiritual writings. Her continual appeals for civil peace and reform of the Church make her one of the leading figures of the fourteenth century. Worn out by her mortifications and negotiations she died in Rome on April 29, 1380.

Our Lady of Good Counsel

The devotion to our Lady of Good Counsel originated at Gennazzano, a village in the neighborhood of Rome, where an Augustinian church, in which is enshrined a miraculous picture of our Lady, had been for centuries a place of popular pilgrimage. This feast is observed in Canada.

St. Apollonius

Historically today is the feast of St. Apollonius, the Apologist, a martyr whose Apologia, or defense of the faith, is called one of the most priceless documents of the early Church. Apollonius was a Roman senator who was denounced as a Christian by one of his slaves. The Praetorian Prefect, Sextus Tigidius Perennis, arrested him, also putting the slave to death as an informer. Perennis demanded that Apollonius denounce the faith, and when he refuesed, the case was remanded to the Roman senate. There a debate took place between Perennis and Apollonius that clearly outlines the beauty and the value of Christianity. Despite his eloquent defense, Apollonius was condemned and beheaded.

Jesus feeds the 5000

Today is a day filled with silence. Those who loved and followed Jesus were mourning because their
Saviour had died. It seemed as if death had the final word as they saw the sealed tomb. Today we can
enter into the mourning, the silence, the stillness.
As we know, death marks the end of a life on earth. There is a finality to it that can be scary to think
about—and often we choose not to. Today, let us spend some time thinking about Jesus in the tomb,
lifeless and still. Contemplate how death was the final word on our life before the resurrection. If we’re
able to grasp the finality of death, then we can start to ponder the great power the Lord has to
overcome it. Where there was death, He brought life

St. Julius I

According to the Roman Martyrology, today is the feast of St. Julius, a Roman who was chosen Pope on the 6th of February in 337. He ruled the Church until 352 and received the appeal from St. Athanasius, whom he defended against his Arian accusers. The letter he wrote to the East on this occasion is one of the most momentous pronouncements of the Roman See. He built several churches in Rome and ranks as one of the most distinguished occupants of the Holy See.

St. Magdalena of Canossa

Magdalena of Canossa believed in the love of the Lord Jesus. Sent by the Holy Spirit among those most in need, she served them with a Mother’s heart and an Apostle’s zeal.

Easter Sunday

Easter is the feast of feasts, the unalloyed joy and gladness of all Christians.

In the very center of the Mass, the great prayer of thanksgiving, from the first words of the Preface, expresses the unrivalled motive for this joy: if it is right to praise You, Lord, at all times, how much more so should we not glorify You on this day when Christ our Passover was sacrificed, for He is the true Lamb who took away the sins of the world, who by His Death destroyed our death and by His Resurrection restored our life. Easter means, then, Redemption obtained — sin destroyed, death overcome, divine life brought back to us, the resurrection of our body which is promised immortality. With such a certitude, we should banish all trace of sadness.

Holy Saturday

Today is a day filled with silence. Those who loved and followed Jesus were mourning because their
Saviour had died. It seemed as if death had the final word as they saw the sealed tomb. Today we can
enter into the mourning, the silence, the stillness.
As we know, death marks the end of a life on earth. There is a finality to it that can be scary to think
about—and often we choose not to. Today, let us spend some time thinking about Jesus in the tomb,
lifeless and still. Contemplate how death was the final word on our life before the resurrection. If we’re
able to grasp the finality of death, then we can start to ponder the great power the Lord has to
overcome it. Where there was death, He brought life

Easter Vigil

The Easter Vigil liturgy is the most beautiful liturgy in the Roman Catholic Church. This walks through the Easter Vigil, and includes the words to the Exsultet.

Good Friday

As the Gospel story of Jesus’ passion unfolds today, we witness the light of the world being led from one interrogator to another and finally condemned to a cruel death, by crucifixion. Drawn like Peter, we follow him who has also befriended us so completely. We are disturbed and inspired at the same time.